The Westchester County Association (WCA) is the leading economic development and business advocacy organization serving Westchester County and the Region.

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WCA Smart Growth Focus Areas

With the passage of the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act, New York now has one of the strongest climate change laws in the world. In order to meet these ambitious goals and become a leader in the fight for a clean energy future, professional stakeholders across the political spectrum will need to be proactive.
More than just an immense benefit to the people who live in the Westchester region, proximity to world-class health facilities is a key business and talent driver. Regionally, the healthcare and life science sector contributes over $18 billion in economic impact and employs well over 70,000.
As the economy reopens, Westchester is poised to become an attractive destination for businesses and residents wishing to remain close to New York City but with a less dense urban environment. We continue to encourage suburban clusters (comprising attractive office space close to retail and lifestyle amenities) through proper development incentives and zoning modifications.
Regions that focus on talent and workforce development benefit economically. How is the WCA connecting businesses with talent?
Broadband and wireless communications is the means by which we stay connected to our workplaces, schools, healthcare providers, news and entertainment, and each other – as evidenced by the COVID-19 pandemic – where real time video platforms became the norm in work from home, remote learning, and telemedicine environments. But the pandemic has also exacerbated the effects of a long-standing digital divide in our region, where, for example, many children are unable to participate in remote learning due to the lack of device ownership and connectivity.
With the passage of the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act, New York now has one of the strongest climate change laws in the world. In order to meet these ambitious goals and become a leader in the fight for a clean energy future, professional stakeholders across the political spectrum will need to be proactive.
More than just an immense benefit to the people who live in the Westchester region, proximity to world-class health facilities is a key business and talent driver. Regionally, the healthcare and life science sector contributes over $18 billion in economic impact and employs well over 70,000.
As the economy reopens, Westchester is poised to become an attractive destination for businesses and residents wishing to remain close to New York City but with a less dense urban environment. We continue to encourage suburban clusters (comprising attractive office space close to retail and lifestyle amenities) through proper development incentives and zoning modifications.
Regions that focus on talent and workforce development benefit economically. How is the WCA connecting businesses with talent?
Broadband and wireless communications is the means by which we stay connected to our workplaces, schools, healthcare providers, news and entertainment, and each other – as evidenced by the COVID-19 pandemic – where real time video platforms became the norm in work from home, remote learning, and telemedicine environments. But the pandemic has also exacerbated the effects of a long-standing digital divide in our region, where, for example, many children are unable to participate in remote learning due to the lack of device ownership and connectivity.

Why Westchester?

Westchester’s economy is growing faster than it has in decades. New companies are starting up and existing enterprises are expanding, drawing highly educated, passionate young people to contribute to the renaissance and creating a powerful cycle of business opportunity.

Learn more about Westchester County

News and Updates

It may come as no surprise, but county executives in Westchester and the Hudson Valley have upbeat views of where their counties stand financially, in the recovery from Covid, as hosts to businesses and in helping residents enjoy the highest possible quality of life. The season for messages about the state of the various counties peaked recently with addresses by the county executives in Westchester and Dutchess.
When Hurricane Ida smashed into Mamaroneck in September 2021, businesses across the town faced some of the worst flooding in living memory. "We had six feet of water in our two front buildings and four feet of water in our shop building," recalls Michael Murphy of Murphy Brothers Contracting, a 50-year-old, family-owned and Mamaroneck-based general contracting firm. "That storm was a monster."
Leslie Hollingsworth has 16 years of experience teaching third grade in New York City. She enjoyed the position — it’s easier to mold their minds in third grade, she said of teaching young children versus teenagers — but circumstances have led her back to the job market. On a recent Thursday, she visited a job fair in Peekskill, where the Peekskill City School District’s table was among the longest
It may come as no surprise, but county executives in Westchester and the Hudson Valley have upbeat views of where their counties stand financially, in the recovery from Covid, as hosts to businesses and in helping residents enjoy the highest possible quality of life. The season for messages about the state of the various counties peaked recently with addresses by the county executives in Westchester and Dutchess.
When Hurricane Ida smashed into Mamaroneck in September 2021, businesses across the town faced some of the worst flooding in living memory. "We had six feet of water in our two front buildings and four feet of water in our shop building," recalls Michael Murphy of Murphy Brothers Contracting, a 50-year-old, family-owned and Mamaroneck-based general contracting firm. "That storm was a monster."
Leslie Hollingsworth has 16 years of experience teaching third grade in New York City. She enjoyed the position — it’s easier to mold their minds in third grade, she said of teaching young children versus teenagers — but circumstances have led her back to the job market. On a recent Thursday, she visited a job fair in Peekskill, where the Peekskill City School District’s table was among the longest